Petition Requesting That The Federal Emergency Management Agency Amend Its Regulations Implementing the National Flood Insurance Program

Petition Requesting That The Federal Emergency Management Agency Amend Its Regulations Implementing the National Flood Insurance Program

I. Introduction

Flooding poses a significant threat to life and property and is the most common natural hazard in the United States. Since 1973, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) has paid more than $69 billion in flood insurance claims, half of which have occurred in the last 12 years. Further, the risk of flooding is increasing due to climate change impacts, like sea level rise and changing precipitation patterns, and increased development in the nation’s floodplains. As atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations continue to rise, flood risk will continue to increase, presenting grave challenges to our nation’s cities, towns, and neighborhoods when floods strike.

II. Petitioners

Petitioner NRDC is an international, non-profit environmental and public health membership organization with more than three million members and online activists. NRDC’s advocates to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause climate change, increase the resilience of communities to the unavoidable impacts of climate change, safeguard human health, and ensure safe drinking water for all. NRDC’s members are at risk of harm because FEMA’s regulations implementing the NFIP fail to adequately account for increased flood risk due to climate change.

Petitioner ASFPM is a non-profit scientific and educational organization with a mission to reduce flood risk and recognize the natural functions of floodplains. ASFPM and its 37 Chapters represent over 20,000 flood risk management professionals. Our members work with FEMA every day, implementing the NFIP, the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, and a variety of agency programs. In addition, ASFPM works with USACE, HUD, NOAA, EPA, and others to reduce future risk from existing storms and rainfalls and to help communities prepare for, mitigate, and reduce flood risk, deaths, and damages.

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