Author: richards

Employee

Images of Katrina

The fifth anniversary of Katina is approaching, so this blog will devote some days to Katrina related posts. I sat out Katrina in Baton Rouge, where we got some damage, but where Rita was the more dangerous storm. LSU was…

Louisiana DNR Redefines Coastal Zone Boundry

DNR Coastal Zone boundary study recommends additional regulated areas, new approaches to management

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The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources’ (DNR) Office of Coastal Management on Wednesday delivered the results of a science-based study on the inland boundary of the state’s coastal zone[…]

Climate Adaptation in the Caribbean

Grand Cayman, 18 August 2010 – The Caribbean Catastrophe Risk Insurance Facility (CCRIF) has released the preliminary results of a study on the Economics of Climate Adaptation (ECA) in the Caribbean. In releasing the results, CCRIF Chairman Milo Pearson indicated that they will “enable countries in the region to develop fact-based adaptation strategies that can be incorporated into national development plans to increase resilience against climate hazards.”[…]

Eaarth – A mini-review

Eaarth: Making Life on a Tough New Planet, Bill McKibben, Time Books (2010) First, my prejudice in reading this book – I was looking for a book to introduce law students to global warming and to the idea of adaption,…

Ocean Rise and Alaskan Native Villages

June 2009. GAO was asked to report on (1) the flooding and erosion threats that Alaska Native villages currently face, (2) the federal programs that are available to assist villages facing potential disasters, (3) the status of village relocation efforts, and (4) how federal assistance to relocating villages is prioritized. GAO interviewed and gathered documentation from federal and state agency officials as well as regional organizations and village representatives.

 

June 2004. Report of Statements of Robert A. Robinson, Managing Director Natural Resources and Environment; Villages Affected by Flooding and Erosion Have Difficulty Qualifying for Federal Assistance.

A Deadly Coast

Southern Louisiana is the most endangered land in the United States. Some risk is due to man made factors, but much of the risk is secondary to long-term geologic and weather cycles that have periodically raised and then inundated the…

About the blog

Southern Louisiana is the most endangered land in the United States. Some risk is due to man made factors, but much of the risk is secondary to long-term geologic and weather cycles that have periodically raised and then inundated the United States well into the Midwest. The core threat to people and culture in Southern Louisiana is building on land that was already headed for inundation before there was any human intervention. Man has hastened the process, and, with levees, denied its existence.

This Blog will consider the factors affecting coastal areas including global warming. While due attention will be paid to short term issues such as evacuations and disaster response, the primary objective is to explore how man can retreat from endangered coastal areas in a orderly fashion. If such a retreat can be envisioned and enabled, then lives, money, and cultures can be saved. If not, pursuing current strategies of denial and patronage-driven public works projects will only assure that all three are lost.

Edward P. Richards, JD, MPP
Director, Program in Law, Science, and Public Health
Professor of Law
LSU Law Center
richards@lsu.edu
https://biotech.law.lsu.edu