Barrister’s Bowl XXII

(Photos: Emily Brauner, LSUNOW)

By: Jacob Longman

Some rivalries stretch across the ages. Invoking images of greatness, the rivals shine brightly, each comparing and contrasting with the other until it becomes impossible to define one without mentioning the other. Their names are legendary: Manning and Brady; Larry Bird and Magic Johnson; and Team Purple and Team Gold.
On Saturday, Feburary 7th, the Purple Perps and the Golden Generals took to the field, steeped in a rivalry that will surely go down in the annals of the Paul M. Hebert Law Center. Absent from the proceedings this year was long time attendee Interim Chancellor Cheney Joseph, who passed away from cancer last semester. All proceeds from the game were donated to the American Cancer Society in his honor.  (more…)

Dean Search Narrows to Two Candidates

By: Bill Schulz

As the Paul M. Hebert Law Center’s academic year fades from fall into spring, its direction and leadership for presumably the next several years is now being determined.  Specifically, a new administrative head of the Law Center will be appointed before the end of the spring semester.  The deanship is a new position created in the wake of the campus reorganization that saw the Law Center merged back into the main campus; it had been an autonomous institution with its own chancellor until 2015.

The new dean will face a number of challenges immediately upon assuming office.  First, the ongoing budget crises that have plagued Louisiana higher education for the past several years will continue to affect the Law Center, albeit indirectly as a result of any cuts to the Louisiana State University system’s budget.  Second, the new dean will need to grapple with recent faculty resolutions regarding diversity matters.  Finally, the overall direction of the Law Center and its educational program looms large, as the civil and comparative law portion of the law degree becomes optional, and the balance between producing practice-ready attorneys trained by experienced practitioners and legal researchers trained by highly skilled scholars must be reset.  Related to this last issue is the need to maintain a relatively high first time bar passage rate and exceptionally high employment figures for recent graduates. (more…)

LSU Hosts 5th Annual Arbitration Competition

By: Robert Glueck

Congratulations to Caitlin Cline and Rome Gonsoulin, the winners of the 2016 LSU Arbitration Competition!

Congratulations to Caitlin Cline and Rome Gonsoulin, the winners of the 2016 LSU Arbitration Competition!

On January 29-31, the LSU Law Trial Advocacy executive board will host its 5th annual Arbitration Competition. The competition, which dates back to the 2011-2012 school year, focuses on disputes which arise in transactional or business settings, such as employment-related disputes or disputes over real property. This year’s competition centers on a dispute between an individual and a farming corporation regarding the sale of real property. According to Professor Jeff Brooks, Director of Trial Advocacy Programs at LSU Law, the 2011-2012 Trial Advocacy Executive board created this competition in light of the need to prepare students for alternative dispute resolution, which is becoming more common in today’s legal landscape. (more…)

Jogging for Cheney Joe

By: Annie Beckstrom

January 10th marked the first annual “Jog for Cheney Jo,” a two-mile run created by the LSU Law Running Club and SBA to honor the memory of beloved professor and Interim Dean, Cheney Joseph.

Current students, alumni, faculty and others in the legal community were invited to participate in a quick jog around the LSU lakes and sorority row, which ended in a celebratory gathering at the Law Center featuring Professor Joseph’s drink of choice, Natural Light. Those who could not attend the run were encouraged to pay homage to Professor Joseph by going for a run, snapping a picture, and posting it to various social media outlets with the hashtag, “#jogforcheneyjo.” (more…)

Making a Murderer: Challenging the Justice System

By: Jacob Longman

AP Images

AP Images

The tension between factual innocence and legal guilt is where Netflix’s Making a Murderer builds its home. Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos, the filmmakers, spent ten years following the case to make their documentary and it’s clear fairly early on what they believe actually occurred in the case of Steven Avery, a Wisconsin man on trial for the murder of a photographer named Teresa Halbach. What caught the filmmakers attention is the hook of the whole documentary. Before going to trial for the murder of Halbach, Avery had been exonerated by DNA evidence after spending eighteen years in jail for a violent rape that he didn’t commit. (more…)




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