Secret Lives at PMH: George Hardy

By: Elizabeth Wong

Name: George Hardy

Class: 3L


george hardyQ: What do you plan to do after LSU Law?
A:I hope to get paid to be a lawyer and do lawyer things.

Q: Rumor has it that you’ve had a myriad of different jobs, what kind of jobs have you held?
A: I have worked for an exotic mushroom delivery service. I have been a barista and a bartender. I was a graduate teacher of East Asian and Native American Religions at the University of Colorado. I studied Sanskrit at Naropa University. I have been an antiques dealer, a booking agent and a band manager, a web and graphic designer, a product designer, and small business owner, operator, and consultant. I also delivered pizzas when I was a kid, but I tend to keep that off my resume.

Q: What has been your favorite job?
A: Probably doing independent graphic design and working with small businesses to help them with logos, branding and market placement; just helping them get up and running. (more…)

Dean Search Narrows to Two Candidates

By: Bill Schulz

As the Paul M. Hebert Law Center’s academic year fades from fall into spring, its direction and leadership for presumably the next several years is now being determined.  Specifically, a new administrative head of the Law Center will be appointed before the end of the spring semester.  The deanship is a new position created in the wake of the campus reorganization that saw the Law Center merged back into the main campus; it had been an autonomous institution with its own chancellor until 2015.

The new dean will face a number of challenges immediately upon assuming office.  First, the ongoing budget crises that have plagued Louisiana higher education for the past several years will continue to affect the Law Center, albeit indirectly as a result of any cuts to the Louisiana State University system’s budget.  Second, the new dean will need to grapple with recent faculty resolutions regarding diversity matters.  Finally, the overall direction of the Law Center and its educational program looms large, as the civil and comparative law portion of the law degree becomes optional, and the balance between producing practice-ready attorneys trained by experienced practitioners and legal researchers trained by highly skilled scholars must be reset.  Related to this last issue is the need to maintain a relatively high first time bar passage rate and exceptionally high employment figures for recent graduates. (more…)

LSU Hosts 5th Annual Arbitration Competition

By: Robert Glueck

Congratulations to Caitlin Cline and Rome Gonsoulin, the winners of the 2016 LSU Arbitration Competition!

Congratulations to Caitlin Cline and Rome Gonsoulin, the winners of the 2016 LSU Arbitration Competition!

On January 29-31, the LSU Law Trial Advocacy executive board will host its 5th annual Arbitration Competition. The competition, which dates back to the 2011-2012 school year, focuses on disputes which arise in transactional or business settings, such as employment-related disputes or disputes over real property. This year’s competition centers on a dispute between an individual and a farming corporation regarding the sale of real property. According to Professor Jeff Brooks, Director of Trial Advocacy Programs at LSU Law, the 2011-2012 Trial Advocacy Executive board created this competition in light of the need to prepare students for alternative dispute resolution, which is becoming more common in today’s legal landscape. (more…)




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