Tag Archive: Russia


Russian “Gay Propaganda” Law under Fire (Again) after a Newspaper Editor Fined

A Russian court fined Alexander Suturin, a news editor for the Molodoi Dalnevostochnik, a weekly-published newspaper in Khabarovsk, Russia, 50,000 rubles (1421.70 USD) for violating a Russian law which bans “gay propaganda” among minors. The court found Suturin guilty because he published a story about a Russian teacher, Alexander Yermoshkin, who claimed he was fired from his teaching position at Khabarovsk’s School Number 32 because of his sexual orientation. Suturin said he would appeal the ruling.

Russia’s new prohibition against “gay propaganda” that could be accessible to minors took effect last summer. Russian President Vladimir Putin assured the public that the new “gay propaganda” law would not affect the LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender) community’s job prospects, saying “the rights of people with nontraditional orientation are infringed upon neither in terms of profession nor salary level.” Putin said that the law is about protecting children, not banning homosexuality. The “gay propaganda” law applies to individuals as well as the media; if anyone, protestor or editor, disseminates information which Russian authorities consider to be “pro-gay propaganda,” they’ll be submit to the fine. Russia’s highest court held that the “gay propaganda” law is constitutional because it applies equally to heterosexuals and homosexuals, stating that the state had an interest in protecting motherhood, childhood, and family. This content-based restriction on speech would likely be unconstitutional in the United States under the First Amendment of the Constitution.

Russia’s “gay propaganda” law has drawn criticism from the international community, fueling the proponents calling for a boycott of the winter Olympics to be held in Sochi, Russia, due to start on Friday, February 7, 2014.

The EU’s Proposed Trade Deal With Ukraine

The newly proposed EU Association Agreement between the EU and Ukraine is aimed at establishing political association and economic integration. It is expected to replace the 1998 Partnership and Cooperation Agreement as a basis for bilateral relations. However, tough admission standards could keep Ukraine’s trade integration with the European Union on hold. If the process is dragged out long enough, Ukraine may be forced back into the arms of its ex-Soviet ally, Russia.

European Union ministers will meet on November 18 to decide if Kiev has met enough of the criteria to sign the dotted line on its trade association agreement. 

The Ukrainian government approved their draft resolution on September 18 and the agreement will either get a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ at the Eastern Partnership Summit in Lithuania on November 28-29. 

If the EU officials reject Ukraine from their trade association, Kiev will need to reconsider Moscow’s proposal to join the Russia-led Customs Union. Russian President Vladimir Putin has tirelessly tried to convince Ukraine to join Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, and other former Soviet nations in a trade bloc that will rival the EU.

Ukraine is facing its most important economic crossroads since the collapse of the Soviet Union. It is caught between two stools – it wants to move towards integration with the west, but doing so is irritating Russia, which imports nearly 25 percent of Ukraine’s export goods.

Russia is Ukraine’s main source of energy, loans, and trade and it wants to dissuade its geographical partner from making what it considers a suicide move towards Europe.  Instead, Russian Prime Minister Putin does not want Ukraine to sacrifice the option of joining Russia’s customs union.

Specifically, Russia has made it clear there will be no ‘bridge’ if Ukraine steps West and they will give up their ‘exclusive relationship’ with Russia.  But if Kiev fails to sign an EU association agreement, Russia could launch a multi-billion dollar joint project with Ukraine aimed at diversifying the country’s economy.

Possible EU Deal With Ukraine Upsets Russia

This November, Ukraine and the European Union have plans to sign a free-trade and political association agreement. Russia, however, seeks instead to lure Kiev into a Moscow-led economic union. This past weekend, Russia has upped the pressure it exhibited on the Ukraine over the summer by banning the products of a major confectionary maker in Russia.  This banning has temporarily halted some Ukrainian imports at its border, dealing a painful blow to Ukrainian business.

On Saturday, September 20, 2013, a top Russian official warned Ukraine against signing the landmark trade and cooperation agreement with the European Union, saying Moscow would retaliate with trade restrictions that could push this ex-Soviet republic toward default. Earlier that week, at a conference in the Black Sea city of Yalta, Russian presidential adviser Sergei Glazyev dismissed the benefits of the planned free-trade deal between the EU and Ukraine as “mythology.” He warned that the tariffs and trade checks that Russia would impose after the deal could cost Ukraine billions of dollars and result in a default. Russians say they fear its market could be flooded by competitive EU goods entering Ukraine free of import duties and being re-exported across the long border with Russia.

In response, European Union officials have urged Kiev to implement the key reforms and sign the EU deal in November, saying Ukraine belongs with the West. The key obstacle to the deal is the incarceration of former Ukrainian Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko, whose verdict the West has condemned as politically motivated. Western governments are pressing hard for her release.




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