Tag Archive: Italy


Tragedy Leads to Reform of Immigration Policy in European Union

 A shipwreck last week near the Italian island of Lampedusa  that killed almost 300 African  migrants has ignited a political debate to further protect the borders of the European Union.  The shipwreck was caused by water that flooded the ship which mixed with the fuel and caused it to igniteThe public response to the  tragedy has forced the European Union to adopt a new surveillance system that will help alleviate the European Union’s growing problem with illegal immigrants. 

The citizens of Lampedusa have previously complained to the European Union about the thousands of migrants who illegally cross their borders every year from Africa and the Middle East. While trying to mourn the tragedy, the European Commission President, Jose Manuel Barroso, was heckled by the islanders protesting the current immigration policy.

In response to the rising concerns and protests about the current immigration policy, European Home Affairs Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom proposed expanding the role of the agency that patrols the sea for migrant ships. Currently the agency, Frontex, only can patrol off the coast of Italy using equipment loaned from the EU member states but the proposal suggests requesting the EU governments to give cash and to provide the boats and aircrafts that will protect the Mediterranean Sea.

The surveillance system that the EU has adopted is predicted to improve information gathering and information sharing throughout the member states while using satellites to help deter another tragedy such as this one from happening again.  In the interim, President Jose Barroso has promised Italy 30 million euro to provide assistance to care for the migrants.

EU Arctic Aspirations Stonewalled Again

For the second time, the Arctic Council has deferred an EU application to become an observer on the multilateral Arctic forum. The Arctic Council was formally established through the Ottawa Declaration in 1996. The impetus behind the Council’s inception was the need for an intergovernmental  forum in which Arctic states could cooperate in matters mutually beneficial for the region.

The European Commissioner for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Maria Damanaki, has argued that the EU “has a stake in what happened in the Arctic”, and “is an Arctic actor by virtue of its three Arctic states, Denmark, Finland, and Sweden.” The EU has not shied away from speaking about its Arctic interests. In June 2012, the Commission proposed a three point Arctic policy, the most salient of which is the sustainable development of resources.

It is undeniable that the EU has a stake in the future of Arctic development. It is estimated over 90% of Europe’s oil production and 60% of its gas production comes from offshore operations occurring in the North Sea and Norwegian Sea. Moreover, an estimated 13% of the world’s undiscovered oil reserves and 30% of its undiscovered gas reserves are lying within the Arctic seabed. Additionally, proponents of EU accession have argued that climate change is a trans-boundary issue, and thus, will adversely impact European weather patterns and fish stocks.

There have been two primary arguments against the EU attaining permanent observer status in the Arctic Council. First, the Heritage Foundation has repeatedly asserted that the EU is a “supernational” organization and, therefore, does not meet the criteria to join the Arctic Council as an observer. Second, the Canadian government has opposed EU observer status since the EU submitted its first application in 2009.

Canadian opposition began in May 2009 when the European Parliament voted 550-49 to impose a seal trade ban throughout the European Union. A Canadian Inuit group challenged the ban, but the General Court of the EU dismissed the appeal. Additionally, similar challenges have been brought before the European Court of Justice, but they also resulted in dismissal. Consequently, this lack of success in the European courts inspired a Nunavut-based group to begin the “No Seal, No Deal” petition calling on the Canadian government to reject the EU’s application for full observer status.

This second argument may carry more weight with the Arctic Council than the former. Following the announcement of the EU’s deferral, Leona Aglukkaq, the new Canadian chair of the Arctic Council, pointed out that one of the criteria that observers must meet is to demonstrate respect for the traditional ways of life of the indigenous people of the North.

The EU’s interests in the Arctic are not disappearing any time soon. Recently, Italy joined EU member states: France, Germany, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain, and the United Kingdom, as observers on the Arctic Council while Finland, Sweden, and Denmark all have permanent membership. Hopefully these EU Arctic actors will keep the EU’s best interest in mind until relations are able to thaw with Canada.

EU Responds To Racism Aimed At Italian Official

When Italy’s Integration Minister, Cecile Kyenge, was appointed back in April of 2013, her nomination was tarred by distasteful comments and racist attacks by unknown critics. Kyenge, an eye doctor and Italian citizen originally from the Democratic Republic of Congo, is Italy’s first Black minister. This past summer, Kyenge continued to be on the receiving end of racist jibes but this time it came from Italian politicians stemming from Italy’s rightwing members known as the Northern League Regionalist Party. In July, Roberto Calderoli, the League’s deputy speaker in the upper house of Parliament, sparked horror when he said the 48-year-old minister had “the features of an orangutan”. Calderoli was stiffly reprimanded for his comments by Prime Minister Enrico Letta, but as of today he remains in his position in the senate. Calderoli’s comments led Joëlle Milquet, the Deputy Prime Minister of Belgium, to suggest the recent meeting accompanied by seventeen European Union representatives to sign the recent “Declaration of Rome” which took place on September 23rd.  The purpose of the meeting was to provide a robust response not only to Kyenge’s trials but also to those of racism sufferers throughout Europe. The recent “Roman declaration” is not only Europe’s response to the attacks and insults directed at Kyenge since her appointment but it also serves to remind Europe of its founding values. The participating European Union representatives signed the declaration condemning racism and urging greater action to promote diversity across the Union.




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