Tag Archive: Health risks


The European Union Attempts to Tackle Obesity

Obesity experts are perplexed over the European Commission’s decision to allow a “health claim” for fructose.  Regulation 536/2013 states: “In order to bear the claim, glucose and/or sucrose should be replaced by fructose in sugar-sweetened foods or drinks so that the reduction in content of glucose and/or sucrose, in these foods or drinks, is at least 30 percent.”  Now, manufacturers of drink products can claim their products are healthier than their competitors by replacing the sucrose and glucose in the product with fructose.  The European Food Safety Authority advised the European Commission on this matter.  They concluded fructose has a lower glycaemic index and does not cause rapid or high blood sugar spikes like sucrose and glucose.  This regulation benefits citizens trying to reduce their glycaemic responses likes those with type 2 diabetes.  However, what about the overall effect of high fructose levels on EU citizens?

Fructose, the simple sugar found in fruits, was once thought to be a healthier substitute for table sugar or glucose.   The moderate amount of fructose consumed naturally from fruits is beneficial, because it allows the body to process glucose better. However, the high amounts of fructose contained in fructose corn syrup are not natural.  The human body processes fructose much less easily than glucose.  Fructose is processed in the liver, and the liver cannot process large amounts of fructose fast enough to turn it into energy. Therefore, the body turns the extra fructose into fats.  The lack of moderation in fructose leads to heart disease, obesity, cancer, dementia, and liver failure.

European obesity experts are concerned about large consumptions of fructose.  It has been linked to the significant rise of obesity rates in the United States and around the world.  The obesity rates in most European countries have doubled over the past twenty years.  More than half the adult population in the European Union is overweight or obese. The argument by obesity experts is that this regulation passed by the European Commission will confuse EU citizens into thinking large amounts of fructose in their products are healthier than sucrose and glucose.

 

Electronic Cigarettes Survive Sweeping Tobacco Regulations

On October 7, the European Parliament finally passed new regulations governing the multi-billion dollar tobacco market.   The new legislation aims at tightening up the 2001 Tobacco Products Directive.  Some of the new sanctions placed on the tobacco industry include:  bigger warning signs on cigarette packs, the elimination of “10-pack” cigarettes, and also a ban on menthol and other flavored additives.  Some of these regulations, if passed by the European Council, would not take effect for another five to ten years.

After intense lobbying from the growing electronic cigarette industry, including global tobacco companies, the European Parliament refused to include the European Commission’s recommendation to classify electronic cigarettes like other medicinal products.  The new tobacco regulations still need approval by the 28 European Union government leaders in the European Council, who along with the European Commission, want electronic cigarettes controlled under medical regulations.  There will soon be an intriguing battle in Brussels.   The European Council has endorsed the European’s Parliament’s philosophy on marketing electronic cigarettes as medicines.  However, the European Council would allow tobacco companies more time to acquire medicines marketing authorization.

Should electronic cigarettes be regulated as tobacco products or should they be sold in pharmacies as medicinal products?  Research claims that 85 percent of electronic cigarette users start in order to help them quit smoking.  Electronic cigarettes also cost 90 percent less than your traditional cigarette.  Most electronic cigarette users think that smoking electronic cigarettes is less harmful than smoking traditional cigarettes.  However, health experts are still divided on the long-term effects of using electronic cigarettes, and they are still years away from uncovering these effects.  At the moment, there is yet a clear answer for the European Union on how to regulate electronic cigarettes.

 

 

 

Should the European Union Regulate E-Cigarettes?

The European Parliament will soon vote on a proposal to revise the current Tobacco Products Directive.  The new directive would classify e-cigarettes as medicinal products. The directive would include a ban on menthol and other flavored cigarettes while requiring mandatory health warnings on the package. This would profoundly restrict present e-cigarettes users’ access to the product, specifically the access of children.

The European Union hopes to reduce the 700,000 deaths attributable to tobacco use across all member-states with the revision. There are not many studies discussing the health benefits or risks associated with e-cigarettes. The United Nations World Health Organization has said the safety of e-cigarettes “has not been scientifically demonstrated…and the potential risks they pose for the health of users remains undetermined.”  The Save E-cigs Campaign said the revision would condemn “Europe’s seven million e-cigarette users to a premature death.” Opponents of the revision claim regulation would raise costs, reduce innovation, and force millions back to tobacco use. Are e-cigarettes really saving lives as the opponents of the revision and certain studies claim? Does the European Union have the authority to enact broader regulation to the Tobacco Products Directive?

The European Court of Justice has stated that regulation on tobacco products to ensure a high level of health protection throughout the member-states is in accordance with the Treaties. Since science has yet to discover the long-term health risks associated with e-cigarette use, the European Union has a duty to regulate a product that could be doing more harm than good. The revision does not ban the product. It simply places them on the same platform as regular cigarettes. E-cigarettes had not gained popularity when the European Union passed the Tobacco Products Directive in 2001. Therefore, this revision is necessary to update the current concerns and trends of European consumers.




Provide Website Feedback / Accessibility Statement / Privacy Statement