The recent Rush Limbaugh controversy has generated two interesting developments in media law. The controversy began about two weeks ago when Limbaugh referred to Sandra Fluke, a Georgetown law student, as a “prostitute” and a “slut” after she testified to congressional Democrats regarding the health care mandate’s coverage of birth control. Shortly after her testimony, Limbaugh said on his talk radio show, “What does it say about the college coed … who goes before a congressional committee and essentially says that she must be paid to have sex? It makes her a slut, right? It makes her a prostitute. She wants to be paid to have sex.” The first interesting development in media law is that Gloria Allred is leading an effort for Limbaugh to be charged with defamation over the comments. Allred, a well-known celebrity lawyer, recently sent a letter to the Palm Beach County Attorney’s Office saying prosecutors should consider charging Limbaugh under an 1883 law making it a misdemeanor to question a woman’s chastity. Allred explains, “He [Limbaugh] has personally targeted her and vilified her, and he should have to bear the consequences of his extremely outrageous, tasteless and damaging conduct.” The second development is that Jane Fonda, Gloria Steinem, and Robin Morgan are calling for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to prevent Limbaugh from continuing his show. In a recent editorial, the three activists argued that if enough listeners complain about Limbaugh, then the stations that carry him could be denied license renewal. One commentator notes that the FCC effort is likely futile because (1) it is logistically difficult based on the nature of the FCC license renewal process; (2) the effort would raise serious First Amendment concerns; and (3) the effort could create a political backlash.