Tag Archive: FInland


EU Arctic Aspirations Stonewalled Again

For the second time, the Arctic Council has deferred an EU application to become an observer on the multilateral Arctic forum. The Arctic Council was formally established through the Ottawa Declaration in 1996. The impetus behind the Council’s inception was the need for an intergovernmental  forum in which Arctic states could cooperate in matters mutually beneficial for the region.

The European Commissioner for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Maria Damanaki, has argued that the EU “has a stake in what happened in the Arctic”, and “is an Arctic actor by virtue of its three Arctic states, Denmark, Finland, and Sweden.” The EU has not shied away from speaking about its Arctic interests. In June 2012, the Commission proposed a three point Arctic policy, the most salient of which is the sustainable development of resources.

It is undeniable that the EU has a stake in the future of Arctic development. It is estimated over 90% of Europe’s oil production and 60% of its gas production comes from offshore operations occurring in the North Sea and Norwegian Sea. Moreover, an estimated 13% of the world’s undiscovered oil reserves and 30% of its undiscovered gas reserves are lying within the Arctic seabed. Additionally, proponents of EU accession have argued that climate change is a trans-boundary issue, and thus, will adversely impact European weather patterns and fish stocks.

There have been two primary arguments against the EU attaining permanent observer status in the Arctic Council. First, the Heritage Foundation has repeatedly asserted that the EU is a “supernational” organization and, therefore, does not meet the criteria to join the Arctic Council as an observer. Second, the Canadian government has opposed EU observer status since the EU submitted its first application in 2009.

Canadian opposition began in May 2009 when the European Parliament voted 550-49 to impose a seal trade ban throughout the European Union. A Canadian Inuit group challenged the ban, but the General Court of the EU dismissed the appeal. Additionally, similar challenges have been brought before the European Court of Justice, but they also resulted in dismissal. Consequently, this lack of success in the European courts inspired a Nunavut-based group to begin the “No Seal, No Deal” petition calling on the Canadian government to reject the EU’s application for full observer status.

This second argument may carry more weight with the Arctic Council than the former. Following the announcement of the EU’s deferral, Leona Aglukkaq, the new Canadian chair of the Arctic Council, pointed out that one of the criteria that observers must meet is to demonstrate respect for the traditional ways of life of the indigenous people of the North.

The EU’s interests in the Arctic are not disappearing any time soon. Recently, Italy joined EU member states: France, Germany, the Netherlands, Poland, Spain, and the United Kingdom, as observers on the Arctic Council while Finland, Sweden, and Denmark all have permanent membership. Hopefully these EU Arctic actors will keep the EU’s best interest in mind until relations are able to thaw with Canada.

Recent Finnish Resistance to European Union Actions

A recent Forbes article addresses Finnish resistance to actions taken by the European Union. Specifically, the Finnish government has opposed expansion of the Schengen Area (an agreement that provides for borderless movement between certain Member States) and has been highly conservative in the approach towards the Greek debt crisis.

Finnish European Union representatives opposed the inclusion of Romania and Bulgaria into the Schengen Area, because of their belief that there is too much organized crime and corruption within Romania and Bulgaria. These criticisms are more than merely political as the attacks rely on core European Union values as promulgated in the Copenhagen Criteria.

Perhaps most important is Finnish resistance to a plan aimed at rescuing the Greek government from overwhelming debt. The Finnish government is adamant that it receive collateral from the Greek government before it agrees to to any bailout. While Finland reached such an agreement with Greece, other Member States which have adopted the Euro are equally as adamant that any concerns about collateral be decided together.

A recent poll evidences a euroskeptic sentiment as only thirty-seven percent of Finnish nationals expressed satisfaction with the European Union. At the very least, these recent divisions between Finland and other Member States threaten the unity of the European Union–a unity which is critical to its strength and longevity.




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