When Italy’s Integration Minister, Cecile Kyenge, was appointed back in April of 2013, her nomination was tarred by distasteful comments and racist attacks by unknown critics. Kyenge, an eye doctor and Italian citizen originally from the Democratic Republic of Congo, is Italy’s first Black minister. This past summer, Kyenge continued to be on the receiving end of racist jibes but this time it came from Italian politicians stemming from Italy’s rightwing members known as the Northern League Regionalist Party. In July, Roberto Calderoli, the League’s deputy speaker in the upper house of Parliament, sparked horror when he said the 48-year-old minister had “the features of an orangutan”. Calderoli was stiffly reprimanded for his comments by Prime Minister Enrico Letta, but as of today he remains in his position in the senate. Calderoli’s comments led Joëlle Milquet, the Deputy Prime Minister of Belgium, to suggest the recent meeting accompanied by seventeen European Union representatives to sign the recent “Declaration of Rome” which took place on September 23rd.  The purpose of the meeting was to provide a robust response not only to Kyenge’s trials but also to those of racism sufferers throughout Europe. The recent “Roman declaration” is not only Europe’s response to the attacks and insults directed at Kyenge since her appointment but it also serves to remind Europe of its founding values. The participating European Union representatives signed the declaration condemning racism and urging greater action to promote diversity across the Union.